Currently Featured in the Gallery:

 

patterns abound

Jurors: Laura Savage and kathy korin

 

Statement:

"Communication Happens" through words and symbols. The pieces chosen for recognition were obvious - as with Grace Mahanes' nuno-felted scarf; hidden on the interior - as with Paige Garber'sshawl; and subtle - as in Gretchen Klimoski'ssashiko wall hangingof interwoven lines with intersecting hubs. There were others that fit the theme, such as Janet Barnard's table runner with invented "letters" which had a dramatic impact. Overall, a feast for the eyes!

Recognitions:

Grace Mahanes, "Cave Art" scarf, nuno felted with ink designs, $100

Paige Garber, "Quotations" shawl and pin, nuno felted with silk designs and pen-and-ink-written words and quotations, $165

Gretchen Klimoski, "Basket Stitch Unraveled", wall hanging, $750


 

Featured artists during this show are Larry Novak, Kay Collins and Gretchen Klimoski.

featuredcorner.jpg

Featured artist corner, at entrance to the gallery.

 
Larry Novak: "After a career as a computer scientist I learned to weave. The algorithmic aspects of weaving appealed to me—the way patterns emerge with changes in the threading of the loom and the sequencing of the weft picks. I am fascinated by weaving’s complexities, the similarities between computer programming and designing woven textiles, and by the color blending that can be achieved by mixing yarn. My work is influenced by the Bauhaus school’s idea of producing beautiful functional crafts. Many of my designs are based on geometry or are influenced by the natural world. I often use my nature photographs to derive color schemes for my art.

Larry Novak: "After a career as a computer scientist I learned to weave. The algorithmic aspects of weaving appealed to me—the way patterns emerge with changes in the threading of the loom and the sequencing of the weft picks. I am fascinated by weaving’s complexities, the similarities between computer programming and designing woven textiles, and by the color blending that can be achieved by mixing yarn. My work is influenced by the Bauhaus school’s idea of producing beautiful functional crafts. Many of my designs are based on geometry or are influenced by the natural world. I often use my nature photographs to derive color schemes for my art.

Kay Collins: "Line, form, space, color, texture…the elements designers use with the principles of balance, emphasis, and continuity to create art. Sometimes it's a conscious thought process, sometimes it's instinctive. We all share this experience. Fiber of one sort or another has always been a part of my life, my first making a gathered skirt in 4-H using flour sack cloth! I've returned to fashion, but now using other fiber media. Tactile and visual texture and color particularly appeal to me, with interspersing of line to tie together pieces of a design.

Kay Collins: "Line, form, space, color, texture…the elements designers use with the principles of balance, emphasis, and continuity to create art. Sometimes it's a conscious thought process, sometimes it's instinctive. We all share this experience. Fiber of one sort or another has always been a part of my life, my first making a gathered skirt in 4-H using flour sack cloth! I've returned to fashion, but now using other fiber media. Tactile and visual texture and color particularly appeal to me, with interspersing of line to tie together pieces of a design.

Gretchen Klimoski: "I draw inspiration from the fiber arts of many cultures and enjoy mixing traditional techniques and reinterpreting them to create contemporary works. I use vintage, traditional, and contemporary fabrics from Japan, Indonesia, Australia, and more in my garments, which I then embellish using the Japanese art of sashiko, a simple running stitch. The stitching of these designs has become a quiet, meditative practice for me.

Gretchen Klimoski: "I draw inspiration from the fiber arts of many cultures and enjoy mixing traditional techniques and reinterpreting them to create contemporary works. I use vintage, traditional, and contemporary fabrics from Japan, Indonesia, Australia, and more in my garments, which I then embellish using the Japanese art of sashiko, a simple running stitch. The stitching of these designs has become a quiet, meditative practice for me.